Wed. Jul 24th, 2019

Why Google decided to honour jazz legend Hugh Masekela with a doodle

This week on Google’s home page on most Google.com home pages was a special Google logo, a Doodle, for the South African trumpeter - Hugh Masekela.

 

By Google and CNN

 

This week on Google’s home page on most Google.com home pages was a special Google logo, a Doodle, for the South African trumpeter – Hugh Masekela.

He (is) was known as the father of South African jazz.

He was born on April 4, 1939 in Witbank and passed at the age of 78 on January 23, 2018 in Johannesburg, South Africa.

He had a top hit in the US named “Grazing in the Grass” and wrote anti-apartheid songs such as “Soweto Blues” and “Bring Him Back Home”.

The Doodle shows the legend playing the trumpet in a very colorful way.

Here is what Google wrote:

Today’s Doodle celebrates the world-renowned South African trumpeter, singer, bandleader, composer, and human rights advocate Hugh Masekela. Born 80 years ago today in the coal-mining town of Witbank, South Africa, Masakela got his first horn at age 14. He went on to play with a wildly popular group known as the Jazz Epistles, the first all-black jazz band to record an album in South African history. However, within the year, its members were forced out of the country by the apartheid government.

The jazz legend and anti-apartheid hero Hugh Masekela on what would have been his 80th birthday.

Known as the father of South African jazz, the trumpet master channeled the struggle against apartheid into soulful compositions that championed the experiences of ordinary South Africans.
In 1960, at the age of 21, Masekela left South Africa to begin what would be 30 years in exile from the land of his birth. On arrival in New York he enrolled at the Manhattan School of Music.

He immersed himself in the New York jazz scene, watching jazz greats such as Miles Davis and John Coltrane.

The Grammy-nominated artist toured with Paul Simon and was a major player on the jazz and world music scene for decades.

Masekela’s 1986 “Bring Him Back Home” song, written for Nelson Mandela, became an anthem of the 1980s anti-apartheid movement.

His career spanned five decades, during which time he released over 40 albums and worked with a range of artists including Nigeria’s Fela Kuti, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder and his former wife, the late Miriam Makeba.
In 1990 Masekela returned home to South Africa, following the release of Mandela from prison.

 

Comment on this report: Call/text/whatsapp: (+27) 834767918

Twitter:@realdigitalnews

Facebook: Zimbabwe Digital News